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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 5, 2015 American Made Matters Day: A Call-to-Action for Consumers ADAMSTOWN, P.A. – American Made Matters, an organization dedicated to educating consumers on the importance of buying American-made products, is holding the 3rd annual American Made Matters Day on November 19th. The purpose of the event is for consumers to buy at least one U.S.-made product on this day, and to encourage consumers to buy made-in-USA products throughout the upcoming holiday season to show their support for US manufacturing. November 19th has been declared American Made Matters Day not just because of the positive impact that manufacturing has on jobs, but also on local communities, the U.S. economy, product safety, the environment, and the future of America. A resolution has been passed in Pennsylvania and Colorado declaring November 19th as American Made Matters Day, and a resolution has been introduced in Alabama and New York. To celebrate American Made Matters Day, events will be held in thirty locations throughout the United States. These events will show the two American Made Matters videos, provide information to consumers, and give consumers the ability to buy U.S.-made products. Some locations will offer food and music. Over forty American Made Matters members, including Todd Shelton, Carole S. Miller Handbags, hats.com, K’NEX, and Ball and Buck, will be offering online sales and specials which will be available on the American Made Matters blog. Bollman Hat Company will again conduct tours in their historic Adamstown, PA factory, the oldest hat factory in America, as well as launch a Kickstarter campaign to bring the iconic Kangol 504 hat production from China to Adamstown, creating 41 new jobs in Pennsylvania. Tacony Manufacturing, which proudly builds Maytag Vacuums, Riccar Vacuums and Simplicity Vacuums, will be offering an open house with factory tours, food and door prizes at their facility in St. James, MO, from 10 AM to 2 PM. Joy Petty, Director of Marketing, said, “We’re delighted to be hosting this American Made Matters Day event to showcase not only the pride we put into every vacuum we build, but also what several other manufacturers in the area are doing to support the USA. After hearing more about the American Made Matters movement, you’ll be amazed at the power you hold in your pocketbook.” Don Rongione, President and Founder of American Made Matters, says, “Buying American made products creates jobs, stronger communities, independence and security for our country, an improved national economy, safer products, and a more environmentally friendly planet. Each of us can make a difference every time we make a purchase. American Made Matters Day was created as a call to action to use our individual purchasing power on November 19 and during the holiday shopping season to make a difference for our future.” The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis reports that every $1 spent on American-made goods invests an additional $1.32 in the U.S. economy. If Americans dedicated just a small portion of their holiday shopping budget to buying American-made goods, it could have a very positive impact on our economy. In fact, according to ABCNews, if each American family spent just an extra $49.95 on American-made goods, the spending would generate 150,000 American jobs. About American Made Matters®: American Made Matters® was launched on July 4, 2009 by the Bollman Hat Company, America’s oldest hat manufacturer. It is the only organization committed to promoting American-made goods that is run by manufacturers. It has over 375 member companies located in 45 states of the 50 US states. For more information, visit http://www.americanmadematters.com, or like them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AmericanMadeMatters. ###
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Rob Spiegel, Senior Editor, Automation & Motion Control 11/2/2015 Near-shoring – the locating of manufacturing and production close to end markets – is gaining traction and, along with reshoring, chipping away at China’s offshore manufacturing empire. A 2015 survey of manufacturing and distribution companies serving North America and Western Europe by AlixPartners shows an acceleration in near-shoring. Thirty-two percent of respondents reported that they have already near-shored or are in the process of doing so to meet end-market demand. Forty-eight percent said they are likely to engage in near-shoring activities within the next one to three years. The shift away from China manufacturing may be small compared to the massive size of the country’s manufacturing sector. But it may be affecting China’s economic growth. In recent months, China’s economic growth has stalled below 7 percent. That growth is still huge compared with growth in developed economies, but it’s small compared with the country’s rapid economic expansion in recent decades. “My very rough estimate is that 400,000 jobs have moved out of China so far,” Harry Moser, founder and president of the Reshoring Initiative, told Design News. “Is that enough for a dent given that China has 100 to 150 million manufacturing workers? I’d say yes, and it’s certainly a huge impact versus shifting maybe 400,000 jobs a year into China from abroad.” Moser noted that the trend away from offshoring manufacturing in China is not exclusive to the US. “This is happening in all developed countries and even some developing countries,” said Moser. “[South] Korea has a program to reshore from China.” While AlixPartners pegs Mexico as the winner in near-shored manufacturing of goods headed for the US and Canadian markets, Moser believes the US will get the bulk of that production work. “Of the work shifting out of China to be sold in North America, our best estimate, based on surveys, is: 40 percent is going to the US; 25 percent to Mexico; a little to Canada; and the rest to Vietnam, Cambodia, India, and others,” said Moser. Moser sees the shift away from China manufacturing as a long-term trend that will force the country to develop its domestic market in order to make up for the loss. “Robust growth [in China] based on exports is history,” said Moser. “Future growth will depend on domestic consumption.”
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Behold, the heavy industry SLJ900/32 mobile bridge erecting machine! Weighing 580 tonnes, measuring 91.8 meters (301 ft.) long, 7.4 meters wide and nine meters high, this mean machine is building bridges in a way we’ve never seen before. Viewers watching the video above can see that the SLJ900/32 operates without conventional crane technology. Instead, the machine travels to the edge of the bridge and reaches out to towers yet to be connected to the bridge with a temporary track. Once the track is stable, the machine pulls itself out with the new bridge segment in tow. Once fully extended with the track and at this point reaching another bridge tower, the SLJ900/32 lowers the new bridge segment in place for the construction crew to begin their work. Once this new segment is secure, the process can be repeated.
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How does today’s tech compare to the alternate 2015 visited by Marty McFly, and which modern marvels could never have been predicted back in the ’80s?
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Imagine a driver-free world. Where technology grabs the wheel and safely chauffeurs you back and forth from point A to point B. It’s closer than you think. Hear what the industry leaders have to say. Learn about the key trends and technology paving the road ahead. And discover the many twist and turns along the way.
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In this video, experts at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center explain how a new robotic composite fiber placement system will be used to build large space structures for space vehicles, potentially increasing the amount of payload that can be carried by a rocket and lowering total production cost. You can also watch the robotic arm going through its paces.
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  Though it’s being introduced toward the end of the summer season, the 3D printed cooler developed by United Kingdom-based startup Nipi Smart Cooler is still a refreshing idea. The cooler can hold ice for as long as six days and is power by a solar panel. It also possesses several features not commonly found in traditional coolers, such as a charging hub, external and internal LED lighting, a safe deposit, cup holders, and a chopping board. Using Stratasys’ 3D printing technology, Nipi was able to produce a functional prototype of its cooler 75 percent faster than traditional manufacturing practices. Since developing the prototype, the company has passed its Kickstarter goal of $60,000, and has received support from an investor in Asia who wanted to ensure that that the cooler would make it to market. According to Nipi Smart Cooler Product Design Lead Luke Guttery, the conversion of the cooler from concept to a working product couldn’t have occurred so quickly without the use of 3D printing. “It’s amazing how quickly we could go from an idea on a piece of paper to a fully-functional prototype that we could test outdoors,” he said. “Without 3D printing, this simply would not have been achievable in the given timeframe. In just a few days we had already produced the main body in UV resistant materials to test the solar panels in the sun, and large-scale over-molded wheels with rigid interiors and rubber treads.” Guttery added that it is important for start-ups to find out as soon as possible if an idea for a product is viable, and that 3D printing expedites that process. Nipi tapped UK-based 3D printing service provider 3D Print Bureau to develop a working prototype. To rid of design flaww, 3D Print Bureau, who is also based in the UK, used both Stratasys’ fused deposition modeling (FDM) and PolyJet 3D printing solutions to create several of the cooler’s parts before final manufacturing. Stratasys’ UV and heat resistant ASA thermoplastic material went into the production of the cooler, making it more resistant to the sunlight it will be exposed to during both outdoor use and solar panel testing. 3D Print Bureau also incorporated Stratasys’ multi-material 3D printing to develop different variations of parts like handles and tires so that they could be tested for hardness. “With the ASA material, we were able to develop a fade-resistant prototype specifically designed for outdoor use. Using multi-material 3D printing, we could accurately validate the pull of the handle and its weight-bearing ability, as well as defining the exact tread of the tires required before moving to final production,” said 3D Print Bureau managing director Gary Miller. “In fact, the ability to over-mold using 3D printing was integral as it helped us determine the shape, thickness and style of the tread you see on Nipi today.” “For many start-ups with great ideas, limited capital to supplement costly and time-consuming traditional manufacturing is often the reason some innovations fail to reach the marketplace,” he said. “3D printing grants product designers the means to quickly and cost-effectively determine whether their idea can function and perform as intended, and Nipi is the perfect example.” Stratasys EMEA President Andy Middelton said that traditional manufacturing can often hamper the efforts of startups because it is more costly and time-consuming. He added that Nipi is an example of a start-up who was able to quickly cost-effectively determine whether its product could work.
 
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Sam’s Club knows its members are always looking for the next big thing! They partnered with 3D+Me to bring this innovative experience to their members at their new club in Moline, IL.
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From IronWorkers Magazine – August 2015 Local 401 Member Invents the “Cable Vault” to Protect Ironworkers In March 2014, Tom Scannell, an 18-year ironworker member of Local 401 (Philadelphia), attended a foreman’s safety meeting at the Local 401 meeting place hosted by Steve Rank, executive director of safety and health for the Iron Workers International, Susan Dachowski of Northwest Erectors and Michelle Paxton of Berlin Steel. At that meeting was discussed the importance of maintaining the integrity of the perimeter cables on a jobsite, and the responsibility, man-hours and liability involved with maintaining the perimeter and interior safety cables. Everyone involved with the erection of a high-rise building is well aware these cables are often removed or altered during the construction process. There are many reasons to alter the cables, whether it is for loading materials, better access to a particular trades work, working with a Lull or to create head room for clearance for a crane pick. Unfortunately, there have been many fatalities and serious injuries attributed to altering perimeter cables. On Tom Scannell’s way home from the meeting he had an idea to design a product that could prevent the removal of cable clamps on safety cables. Tom developed a working draft and prototype of the cable vault and realized there was a great potential for the product to prevent incidents involving the alteration of safety cables. The cable vault can be easily slid over safety cables and clamps immediately after using a cable dog, come-along and installing the cable clamps. Once the cable vault covers the safety cable and clamps, it is locked and cannot be removed without a key. The cable vault is made from HDPE high density polyethylene molded plastic, colored yellow for high visibility, reusable and durable for a shelf life of 2 ½ years, and designed to withstand extreme hot and cold weather conditions. Enser Corp., located in Cinnaminson, New Jersey, fabricates the cable vaults, a family owned company for over 40 years and proud members of American Made Matters. Tom Scannell’s cable vault product helps to prevent workplace incidents attributed to unauthorized removal of perimeter and interior safety cable systems. Congratulations Tom, another great safety innovation developed by a union ironworker. For more product information and to view a photo gallery and video on the cable vault, visit Tom Scannell’s website at cablevault.net or call (215) 708-0189.
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The next time you’re in an airport looking for your terminal, you might be looking down instead of up for directions. That’s because Dutch technology company Philips is rolling out the next big thing in flooring, Luminous Carpet. As shown in this video, the carpet is embedded with a thin layer of light-emitting diodes, or LEDs. When activated by foot traffic, the lighting provides directions or other messages.
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